Passive House tool PHPP validated by ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140-2017

  In January 2019, the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) version 9.6 was evaluated in accordance with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, a comparative testing method for building energy programs. Passive House Institute (PHI) The validation tests consist of a series of carefully described sample case building plans. Results from modelling different test cases with the software being tested are compared to those of reference software results. The class II test cases,…


Virtually no other standard other than the Passive House Standard delivers low energy buildings that can meet our [80×50] goal

Green Light, The Rise of the Energy Efficient Building Byera Hadley Travelling Scholarships Journal Series Kate Nason 2018 [hr] A Standard that Empowers the Profession The following is a non-exhaustive list of the benefits associated with utilising the Passive House Standard in projects: Practice what we preach: Empowers architects to fulfil their obligation in climate protection and allow us to practice what we preach. Verification tool: Testing of the as-built-quality…


Massachusetts Stretch Energy Code will include a Passive House compliance Alternative

Changes to the Massachusetts Commercial and Residential Stretch Energy Code A stretch code is an overlay code that provides a path to achieve greater energy efficiency over the requirements of the base code. With the Green Communities Act in 2008, Massachusetts took a national leadership role in building energy codes by being one of the first states to adopt a “stretch energy code.”   There are THREE options available under…


Denver City Council approves Green Code and lists Passive House certification as compliance path

  We are pleased to share some exciting news from Denver, Colorado. In the City’s efforts to push forward its 80×50 Climate Action Plan, and with the goal of Net Zero new construction by 2035, City Council has approved a voluntary, incentivized “Green Code”. Having identified Passive construction as a critical part of being able to realistically reach Net Zero goals, the Denver Green Code has listed Passive House certification…


Centuries-Old Aesthetics to Converge with Cutting-Edge Technology at Historic Seaport Warehouse

Elsewhere, the Church plans to install solar panels on the roof, and retrofit the building to the "passive house" standard for energy efficiency, which will reduce the structure's ecological footprint, resulting in an ultra-low energy building that uses very little power for heating or cooling. Trinity also plans to create new retail space on the building’s first floor, while restoring the building’s face to a contextual design, using legacy materials…


Support Section R408 Passive House to be included into the New York City Energy Conservation Code (NYCECC)

The proposed bill Introduction No. 1816 of 2019 incorporates the latest version of the New York Stretch Energy Code (NYStretch) as required by Local Law 32 for the year 2018. Local Law 32 mandates that the City amend the NYCECC to align it with the latest version of the NYStretch Energy Code-2020 developed by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The proposed bill eliminates the very critical Section R408 Passive…


Why it is important to include Section R408 Passive House into the New York City Energy Conservation Code (NYCECC)

The proposed bill Introduction No. 1816 of 2019 incorporates the latest version of the New York Stretch Energy Code (NYStretch) as required by Local Law 32 for the year 2018. Local Law 32 mandates that the City amend the NYCECC to align it with the latest version of the NYStretch Energy Code-2020 developed by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The proposed bill eliminates the very critical Section R408 Passive…


NYPH does not support the deletion of Section R408 Passive House from the NYCECC

The New York City Council Committee on Housing and Buildings has scheduled a hearing on Introduction No. 1816 of 2019 for Monday, January 27th 2020 at 10:00 AM at City Hall. This bill would implement section 28-1001.3.1 of the Administrative Code, which requires triennial updates to the New York City Energy Conservation Code (NYCECC). These amendments will bring the NYCECC up to date with the 2020 version of the New York…


NAPHN’s Conference and Expo “Passive House 2020: Choose Your Future” – Important Dates Announced!

Don't miss Passive House 2020: Choose Your Future, NAPHN Conference and Expo. The largest gathering of Passive House professionals and suppliers, to date, in the US. Its core mission​ is to demonstrate and discuss how (and why) building owners, developers, and occupants are choosing Passive House to improve outcomes, minimize uncertainty and risk, provide more control, increase performance and enhance well-being. The event schedule: Pre-conference Workshops on Tuesday & Wednesday,…


New York Passive House & Handel Architects Present “The Passive House Impact”

On Friday, December 6th, Handel Architects opened its doors to a group of young professionals from Deloitte Services interested in learning more about Passive House design. The professionals, who traveled to New York from different locations across the US, work in diverse sectors and had little background knowledge on Passive House prior to the presentation. The presentation speakers included Andreas Benzing, President of New York Passive House; Deborah Moelis, Principal…


Marketing Passive House: Communicating the Value of Passive House Buildings to Clients

Over the past few months, New York Passive House has been working with John Oppermann to shed light on some of the biggest issues facing professionals in the Passive House industry today. In his seminar entitled “Marketing Passive House,” Oppermann highlights the importance of demonstrating the true value of Passive House to consumers, and offers insight into how green building professionals can effectively communicate this information. The first seminar took…


The New York City Climate Mobilization Act (CMA) demands more in energy efficiency from buildings

The new legislation requires that any building 25,000 square feet or larger will need to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent by 2030 from a 2005 baseline, increasing to an 80 percent reduction requirement by 2050. By Todd Kimmel, NYPH Board Member and  Architectural Manager for ROCKWOOL   New York City gets to work as Climate Mobilization Act (CMA) passes New York City produces over 50 million tonnes…